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Viburnum cassinoides

Witherod Viburnum / syn. Viburnum nudum var. cassinoides

Clusters of white flowers are followed by colorful summer fruit, that change from shining pink to red, then becomes blue in late summer before turning black. Sometimes all of these colors are present in the same fruiting cluster. The berries are persistent and add winter interest before the birds gobble them up. The fall foliage is always colorful in shades orange, red and purple. For best cross-pollination and subsequent fruit display, plant shrubs in groups rather than as single specimens. This variety is useful as a pollinator for Viburnum 'Winterthur'. Prefers average, medium to wet, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Tolerates a wide range of soils including boggy ones.


Note: While Viburnum cassinoides is sometimes referred to as Viburrnum nudum var. cassinoides many experts see and small a difference between the two especially in late fall when the foliage has dropped. 

Benefits

  • Beautiful white flowers cover the shrub in early to midsummer
  • It is more tolerant of wet soil than other viburnums
  • Fruit attracts gamebirds, songbirds, shorebirds and mammals
  • Fall foliage turns wonderful shades of red, burgundy and purple
  • It does not require pruning to maintain a nice, round, symmetrical shape
  • The berries are lovely in floral arrangements

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Will withstand seasonaly heavey rain and may be used in rain gardens. It will adapt to most soils and light conditions. Bloom performance will be best with more sun.


Height
5-10 ft

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Spread
5-7 ft

USDA Hardiness Zone 3-6

Native Range

Found in swamps, moist, upland woods and clearings.

Native Trivia

With more than 150 species, viburnums are one of America’s most popular flowering landscape shrubs. They’re popular with birds too. Plant a group to attract robins, bluebirds, thrushes, catbirds, cardinals, finches, waxwings, and more. We call it bird-scaping.

 

Characteristics & Attributes

Shade
Sun
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Songbirds
Wet Sun
Fall Color
Winter Interest
Plan Sub Group
Medium to Tall Shrubs
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Soil
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Moist
Moist but well-drained
Wet
Attracts Wildlife
Mammals
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Summer
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Songbird
Native Habitat
Forest
Grassland
Riparian, wetland
Foliage Color
Dark Green
Uses
Accent
Bog, water garden
Border
Cut or dried flower
Erosion control
Hedge, screen
Mass plant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Ornamental fruit
Specimen
Native to
Alabama
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin