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Asimina triloba

Paw Paw

Unusual spring flowers attract butterflies in April and May. Large fruits are produced in the autumn and fall to the ground when ripe to the delight of ground feeding birds and other beneficial wildlife. More and more people are discovering the tropical taste of pawpaws and their health benefits. 

Benefits

  • Plants of Merit - from the Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Larval host foe Zebra Swallowtail and Pawpaw Sphinx
  • Big flowers are a nectar magnet for butterflies
  • Perfect small tree for cover and bird nesting
  • Deliciously tropical tasting fruit
  • Birds and other wildlife relish the fallen fruit

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Prefers average, medium to wet, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade in slightly acidic fertile soils. Becomes leggy if grown in too much shade. Use it to naturalize in a native plant garden, in a shrub border or woodland margin. It is also ideal for damp areas along ponds and rivers. 


Height
15-20 Feet

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Spread
15-20 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 5-9

Native Range

Grows in cool woods along streams from New York south to Florida and west Nebraska and Texas.

Native Trivia

Pawpaws are high in vitamin C, magnesium, iron, copper, and manganese. They are a good source of potassium and several essential amino acids, and they also contain significant amounts of riboflavin, niacin, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc. 

Characteristics & Attributes

Sun
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Songbirds
Wet Sun
Plan Sub Group
Deciduous Trees
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Soil
Acidic
Heavy clay
Well-drained
Soil Moisture Preference
Moist
Moist but well-drained
Attracts Wildlife
Mammals
Bloom Time
Early Spring
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Songbird
Native Habitat
Forest
Riparian, wetland
Foliage Color
Green
Uses
Accent
Border
Fragrant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Ornamental fruit
Native to
Alabama
Arkansas
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
West Virginia
Wisconsin