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Amelanchier alnifolia

Western Serviceberry

Clusters of fragrant white flowers emerge in early April just before the small, light-green, oval leaves appear. Attracts a wide variety of butterflies. Small, sweet, blue berries ripen in summer and are loved by people and songbirds. Orange to red fall foliage is spectacular and long lasting.

Benefits

  • Early white blossoms have a sweet fragrance
  • Attracts orange tip and elfin butterflies
  • Perfect upright tree for small spaces
  • Sweet berries can be eaten fresh or dried
  • Birds love its berries and protective cover

Height
10-15 Feet

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Spread
6-10 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 2-7

Native Range

Washington south to California, east to Minnesota and Iowa.

Native Trivia

The sweet fruit ripens in early summer along the coast, a bit later inland.  The fruit has long been prized fresh and in baking. It has a high antioxidant level. Native Americans prized its wood for arrows and pipe stems.

Characteristics & Attributes

Sun
Butterflies
Songbirds
Fall Color
Plan Sub Group
Deciduous Trees
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Soil
Saline or alkaline
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Dry
Moist
Moist but well-drained
Bloom Time
Early Spring
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Songbird
Native Habitat
Coastal
Grassland
Foliage Color
Green
Uses
Accent
Fragrant
Hedge, screen
Mass plant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Ornamental fruit
Specimen
Native to
Alaska
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Idaho
Iowa
Minnesota
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
North Dakota
Oregon
South Dakota
Utah
Washington
Wyoming