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Viburnum trilobum

American Cranberry Viburnum

Flat-topped clusters of white flowers up to 4" across bloom in May, providing nectar for butterflies, native bees and other pollinators. Flowers are followed by clusters of brilliant red fruit staying on the plant into late winter when they are finally eaten by birds. New leaves have a reddish cast while fall foliage is yellow through red-purple.

Benefits

Flowers provide nectar for butterflies and other pollinators
Plants provide good nesting sites and cover for birds
Red-purple foliage contrasts with blue-black fruit in the fall
Berries are a great source of winter food for birds and other wildlife
Good plant for screening or a large hedge

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Plant in full sun to part shade. Grows best in well-drained, moist soil. Makes a good hedge or privacy screen.


Height
8-10 Feet

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Spread
8-10 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 3-7

Native Range

Damp thickets, low woods and swamps; Newfoundland to British Columbia south to Washington, Iowa, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Native Trivia

The brilliant red fruits are edible but quite sour and have been used for preserves since colonial times. They tend to be hard, marble-like or bitter after they form, thus persisting through the early winter. As the fruit matures and goes through winter, it eventually becomes palatable and highly sought by wildlife.


"This plant's long lasting berries are an outstanding winter food source for birds."

Characteristics & Attributes

Plan Sub Group
Medium to Tall Shrubs
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Sun
Soil
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Moist
Attracts Wildlife
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Mammals
Songbirds
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Songbird
Wet Sun
Native Habitat
Forest
Foliage Color
Green
Red-Purple
Uses
Border
Cut or dried flower
Hedge, screen
Mass plant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Ornamental fruit
Native to
Connecticut
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Maine
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Montana
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Dakota
Vermont
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming