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Allium cernuum

Nodding Onion / Nodding Wild Onion

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Easy to identify by its distinctive, nodding, pastel lilac-pink flowers in late spring, Nodding Onion thrives in challenging sites such as hot sun and gravely soil. It is strikingly beautiful and is well-suited a formal or wild garden, as well as a natural meadow. Easy, dependable and very drought tolerant once established.

Benefits

Easy to Grow
Attracts hummingbirds and butterflies
Excellent nectar source for native bees
Deer tend to leave this plant alone
Drought Tolerant

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Full sun in moist, average or dry soil. Very easy to grow and drought tolerant once established. Will tolerate light shade, but will give best show in full sun.Allium cernuum forms slowly expanding clumps and can be divided easily at any time. Deadhead flowers before seed sets to help control any unwanted spread. Foliage persists past flowering into late summer before dying back.


Height
12-18 Inches

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Spread
12-18 Inches

USDA Hardiness Zone 3-9

Native Range

Found on ledges, in dry meadows, gravel, rocky or wooded slopes from New York to Michigan and British Columbia, south to Arizona and North Georgia.

Distribution Map

Native Trivia

Though all parts are edible, nodding onion is not considered to be of significant culinary value. The juice of the plant is used as an insect repellent, specifically for moths. The juice can be applied to exposed skin in order to repel biting insects. Some claim that planting nodding nnion repels moles.


"The city of Chicago gets its name from the Algonquin Indian name for this plant, chigagou."

Characteristics & Attributes

Plan Sub Group
Low Perennials
Medium Perennials
Exposure
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Sun
Soil
Acidic
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Dry
Moist but well-drained
Attracts Wildlife
Butterflies
Hummingbirds
Mammals
Bloom Time
Summer
Critter Resistance
Deer Resistant
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Songbird
Native Habitat
Grassland
Foliage Color
Blue-green
Dark Green
Uses
Border
Container
Drought tolerant
Mass plant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Rock garden
Wind tolerant
Native to
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
Colorado
District of Columbia
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Maryland
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming