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Oenothera macrocarpa 'Comanche Campfire'

Comanche Campfire Primrose

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This is a blooming machine! Give it a place in the front of the border or rock garden so you can enjoy the color. Tight buds unfurl to fragrant, lemon-yellow blossoms held on bright red stems. Silvery foliage completes the picture of this heat-loving perennial. It is low growing and spreads almost like a vine.

Benefits

  • Nectar attracts hummingbirds and butterflies
  • Important food source for native bees
  • Attracts large hawk moths
  • Long blooming and colorful
  • Heat and drought tolerant once established
  • Deer resistant

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Deadheading promotes longer flowering.


Height
6-12 Inches

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Spread
1-2 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 5-8

Native Range

Found in limestone glades & bluffs, roadsides, rocky prairies and hillsides.

Native Trivia

Humidity evaporating from this flower's nectar provides a signal to a potential visitor. By sensing the humidity, a Hawkmoth can tell whether Evening Primrose flowers contains nectar without having to land and probe it thereby saving valuable energy.

Characteristics & Attributes

Sun
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Deer Resistant
Ground cover
Plan Sub Group
Low Perennials
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Soil
Saline or alkaline
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Dry
Moist but well-drained
Attracts Wildlife
Hummingbirds
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Late Summer
Summer
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Songbird
Native Habitat
Desert
Grassland
Foliage Color
Gray-green
Silver
Uses
Border
Drought tolerant
Edging
Fragrant
Mass plant
Meadow
Rock garden
Native to
Arkansas
Illinois
Kansas
Missouri
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Tennessee
Texas
Wyoming