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Rhododendron occidentale

Western Azalea

Large, spreading and deciduous, this shrub features small, oval, glossy green leaves that transition to yellow and red in the fall. Big pink buds open in May to big, beautiful white to light pink, gold blotched flowers in round trusses. Perfect for wooded borders and for songbird cover and nesting.

Benefits

Larval or nectar host for Hoary Comma butterfly
Big bloom trusses with outstanding color
Tolerates shade and moist soils well
Fragrant flowers fill the landscape with scent
Perfect nesting spot for many native songbirds
Great for sprawling border areas

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Rhododendrons like loose, crumbly, acidic soil that is rich with decaying organic matter. Rhododendrons grow naturally in the mountains, where water drains off steep slopes, so their soil should be moist but well-drained. 


Height
5-12 Feet

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Spread
8-10 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 7-9

Native Range

Found in moist wooded thickets in Oregon and California.

Native Trivia

The genus Rhododendron includes plants that are commonly called azaleas, as well as those called rhododendrons. Azaleas usually have thin leaves that are not thick and leathery like the leaves found in rhododendrons. While all rhododendrons are evergreen, azaleas can be deciduous or evergreen.


"This plant's sweet flower scent and abundant nectar are irresistible!"

Characteristics & Attributes

Plan Sub Group
Medium to Tall Shrubs
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Shade
Soil
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Moist
Moist but well-drained
Wet
Attracts Wildlife
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Mammals
Songbirds
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Songbird
Native Habitat
Forest
Foliage Color
Green
Red
Yellow
Uses
Accent
Border
Evergreen
Fragrant
Hedge, screen
Mass plant
Specimen
Native to
California
Oregon