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Viburnum prunifolium

Blackhaw Viburnum

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Blackhaw is a large, upright, multi-stemmed, densely twiggy deciduous shrub that can be pruned to grow as a small tree. Creamy white flowers in flat-topped clusters to 4.5" across appear in spring. Flowers provide nectar for butterflies, native bees and other pollinators. Flowers give way to blue-black, berry-like fruits, which are a good source of food for birds and wildlife in fall and early winter. This handsome plant has glossy dark green leaves changing to shades of red and purple in fall.

Benefits

Flowers provide nectar for butterflies and other pollinators
Plants provide excellent nesting sites and cover for birds
Red-purple foliage contrasts with blue-black fruit in the fall
Berries are a great source of food for birds and other wildlife in fall
Grows well in dry soil

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Easy to grow in full sun or part shade. Plant in well-drained, dry to average soil. Tolerates drought. Prune immediately after flowering since flower buds form in summer for the following year. Can be grown as a large, multi-stemmed shrub or small tree.


Height
10-12 Feet

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Spread
6-8 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 3-9

Native Range

Woods, thickets, and fencerows; Connecticut to Wisconsin and Iowa south to Kansas, Texas and Georgia.

Native Trivia

Blackhaw has been in cultivation as an ornamental plant since 1727. The common name is said to refer to the similarity of this plant to hawthorns (sometimes commonly called red haws), though hawthorns are in a different family. Fruits are edible and may be eaten off the bush when ripe or used in jams and preserves.


"Blackhaw provides ample cover and food for birds and their friends."

Characteristics & Attributes

Plan Sub Group
Medium to Tall Shrubs
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Sun
Soil
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Dry
Attracts Wildlife
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Mammals
Songbirds
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Dry Shade
Songbird
Native Habitat
Forest
Foliage Color
Dark Green
Uses
Cut or dried flower
Drought tolerant
Hedge, screen
Mass plant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Ornamental fruit
Native to
Alabama
Arkansas
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin