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Aronia melanocarpa

Black Chokeberry

This shrub is a smaller and better-behaved shrub than its red-fruiting relative. The four-season beauty begins with dainty white flowers in spring followed by lush, shiny foliage in summer. In autumn the dark berries are backed by purple to red fall foliage creating a superb contrast. The berries persist providing food for the birds and other wildlife all winter long.  If left alone, the plants can form colonies that provide food and shelter for wildlife. Low maintenance and tolerant of a wide rang of growing conditions.

Benefits

  • Brilliant red fall foliage
  • Extremely hardy and perfect for hedging
  • Black berries persist and birds love them!
  • Spring flowers are a great source of nectar
  • Deer resistant and easy to grow
  • Berries are high in antioxidants

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Easily grown in wet, average and well-drained soil in full to part sun. Berry production will be best in full sun locations. Highly adaptable and generally not bothered by pests or disease. 


Height
3-6 ft

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Spread
3-6 ft

USDA Hardiness Zone 3-8

Native Range

Found in lowlands, bogs, dunes and bluffs.

Native Trivia

Chokeberry gets its name from its sour fruit which can be sweetened with added sugar. While grocery stores offer the Aronia juice as an alternative to cranberry juice, native birds feast on the berries straight off the bush, whether sweet or sour!

Characteristics & Attributes

Sun
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Songbirds
Deer Resistant
Fall Color
Plan Sub Group
Medium to Tall Shrubs
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Soil
Acidic
Humus-rich
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Moist
Moist but well-drained
Attracts Wildlife
Mammals
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Habitat Collection
Songbird
Native Habitat
Coastal
Grassland
Riparian, wetland
Foliage Color
Dark Green
Green
Uses
Accent
Bog, water garden
Border
Erosion control
Hedge, screen
Mass plant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Ornamental fruit
Specimen
Native to
Alabama
Arkansas
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin