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Aquilegia chrysantha

Golden Columbine

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Golden Columbine adds a bright pop of color to shady gardens with its lemon-yellow blooms. Sturdy stems rise above the fern-like foliage to show off the large, fragrant flowers. The nectar attracts, hummingbirds, hummingbird moths and butterflies. Removing spent flowers will prompt a second bloom.

Benefits

  • Nectar source for hummingbirds, bees, butterflies
  • Attracts hummingbird moths
  • Deer and rabbit resistant
  • Brightens up shady areas with showy blooms
  • Heat tolerant and resistant to mildew
  • Fragrant blooms are perfect for cutting

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Tolerates wide range of soils except heavy, poorly drained ones. Prefers rich, moist soils with light to moderate shade. Remove flowering stems after bloom to encourage additional bloom. Keep soils uniformly moist after bloom to prolong attractive foliage appearance. When foliage depreciates, plants may be cut to the ground.


Height
2-4 Feet

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Spread
1-2 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 4-9

Native Trivia

Aquilegia is the Latin word for eagle, referring to the petals that were thought to look like an eagle's talons. The common name Columbine comes from the Latin word for dove since Romans thought the inverted flowers looked like five doves.

Characteristics & Attributes

Shade
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Deer Resistant
Plan Sub Group
Low Perennials
Medium Perennials
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Soil
Saline or alkaline
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Dry
Moist but well-drained
Attracts Wildlife
Hummingbirds
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Summer
Critter Resistance
Rabbit Resistant
Habitat Collection
Butterfly
Native Habitat
Desert
Foliage Color
Gray-green
Green
Uses
Accent
Border
Container
Cut or dried flower
Drought tolerant
Fragrant
Rock garden
Specimen
Native to
Arizona
Colorado
New Mexico
Texas