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Viburnum dentatum

Southern Arrowwood

Loaded with lustrous leaves, Arrowwood sports flat-topped clusters of white flowers in spring that are a magnet to nectar-seeking native butterflies and bees. Prolific blue berries provide a great fall food source for birds and critters. The orange to red fall foliage is striking.

Benefits

  • Creamy white flowers in spring attract butterflies
  • Deep blue berries feed gamebirds, songbirds and small mammals
  • Stunning yellow to wine-red fall color
  • Easy to grow and low-maintenance
  • Most soil adaptable of all Viburnums

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Plant in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Prune after flowering if nessissary.


Height
6-12 Feet

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Spread
6-12 Feet

USDA Hardiness Zone 2-8

Native Range

Stream banks and moist woods from Maine west to Iowa and south to Texas and Florida.

Native Trivia

Native Americans used the straight stems of this shrub for arrow shafts, hence the common name.

Good Companions
Red Chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia)

Characteristics & Attributes

Sun
Beneficial insects
Butterflies
Songbirds
Deer Resistant
Fall Color
Plan Sub Group
Medium to Tall Shrubs
Exposure
Filtered Shade
Morning Sun / Afternoon Shade
Soil
Well-drained
Wide soil tolerance
Soil Moisture Preference
Average
Moist
Moist but well-drained
Attracts Wildlife
Mammals
Bloom Time
Late Spring / Early Summer
Summer
Native Habitat
Forest
Foliage Color
Green
Uses
Cut or dried flower
Hedge, screen
Mass plant
Meadow
Naturalizes
Ornamental fruit
Native to
Alabama
Arkansas
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Mississippi
Missouri
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia