Dry Shade Gardens

If you have a dry shady area in your garden and nothing you’ve planted seems to live, don’t worry help is on the way. Gardening in dry shade is a special challenge but with the right native plants it’s not impossible. 

  • Dry shade gardens have a subtle beauty
  • You can play with different leaf color, shape and texture
  • Provides food and habitat for wildlife
  • You can use native ephemerals like bloodroot and bluebells

If you have a dry shady area in your garden and nothing you’ve planted seems to live, don’t worry help is on the way. Gardening in dry shade is a special challenge but with the right native plants it’s not impossible. Click here to see our landscape plans for dry shade. You can also search for them using our Native Plant Finder. Next on the to-do list is amend the soil. Adding and mixing in compost and/or well-rotted manure will increase the soils structure and ability to hold water. Covering the bed with an organic mulch will help to keep moisture from evaporating. If possible, some judicious pruning of trees in the area may help by letting in more light. Last but not least, take advantage of early spring light that. Spring ephemerals like bloodroot, bluebells and trout lilies will capture that early light and bloom for you before the deciduous trees leaf out.

Dry Shade Garden Designs